LPO–0002
© 2005 London Philharmonic Orchestra Ltd
℗ 1979, 1984, 1986 BBC
Introduction and Allegro recorded live at the Royal Festival Hall, London, on 27 November 1984. Our Hunting Fathers recorded live at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on 14 August 1979. Enigma Variations recorded live at the Royal Albert Hall on 28 August 1986.
Released by arrangement with BBC Music
Recorded by BBC Radio 3
Publisher: Our Hunting Fathers: Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd
Total playing time 75:18
The London Philharmonic Orchestra wishes to thank Laurie Watt for facilitating the release of this recording.

CD: Haitink conducts Elgar & Britten

LPO conducted by Bernard Haitink

Elgar Introduction and Allegro for string quartet and string orchestra, Op. 47
Britten Our Hunting Fathers, Op. 8 (Words by W.H. Auden)
Elgar Variations on an Original Theme, ‘Enigma’ for orchestra, Op. 36

Bernard Haitink conductor
Heather Harper soprano
London Philharmonic Orchestra
David Nolan leader

As Principal Conductor from 1967–79, Bernard Haitink presided over some of the London Philharmonic Orchestra’s most memorable and exciting years. Live accounts of great British music by Elgar and Britten from the late 1970s and early 1980s capture the animation of this special relationship – one of the greatest in London’s musical history.

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1 Audio CD

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Reviews

‘As one of the few top continental conductors to take British music seriously in the 1970s, Bernard Haitink brought a refreshingly internationalist view to the works of Elgar, and his performances of both the Introduction and Allegro from 1984 and Enigma Variations from two years later put the music firmly in the European symphonic tradition, particularly its debt to the barline – defying metres and melodic shapes of Brahms.’
Matthew Rye, Daily Telegraph, 21 May 2005

‘Under Haitink’s baton, there’s real sensitivity in the Introduction and Allegro, with its pastoral feel and considered tone. Even the rambunctious parts of the Variations come across as bright and breezy rather than heavy-set.’
Alexander Bryce, Scotland on Sunday, 15 May 2005

‘The Britten comes from the end of Haitink’s tenure as Principal Conductor (1979); it finds Harper, the outstanding Ellen Orford soprano of the day, in her most pristine and thrilling voice, bringing one of the least performed of Britten’s orchestral song cycles (one she never recorded commercially) vividly to life in a performance at the Proms. The Elgar performances date from 1984 and 1986 respectively, and reveal what a committed and idiomatic champion of the English composer Haitink was in his LPO years. Collectable, especially for the Britten.’
Hugh Canning, The Sunday Times, 1 May 2005

‘Indefatigably characterful, incisive, emotional’
BBC Music Magazine, July 2005

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